Reboxetine and Psychomotor Function
by
Hindmarch I
University of Surrey,
Department of Human Psychopharmacology,
Milford Hospital, Godalming, UK.
Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 1997 Apr; 7 Suppl 1:S17-21; discussion S71-3


ABSTRACT

This review assesses the relative efficacy and side-effect profile of the currently available treatment options for major depression and the new selective noradrenergic agent, reboxetine. The effects of these treatments on psychomotor function are reviewed using: choice reaction time (CRT) and critical flicker fusion threshold (CFFT) measurements to compare and contrast the various antidepressants. Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) agents are associated with an increased risk of accidents, especially in the elderly (primarily accidents related to driving or falls/fractures due to postural hypotension). In comparison, the newer noradrenergic agents such as reboxetine have demonstrated significant improvements in the incidence and severity of effects on psychomotor function. Such a lack of side-effects makes agents like reboxetine most useful for the treatment of depression in ambulant patients performing their usual activities of daily living.


Efficacy
Reboxetine
Noradrenaline
NARIs and SSRIs
Reboxetine: structure
Dopamine reuptake inhibition
Reboxetine and major depression
Reboxetine and social functioning
Depression, antidepressants and noradrenaline



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